Snap odc5r, snap pac r2, rck16


#1

Dear Sir:

Can you please point me to literature that will tell me how to correctly test the SNAP ODC5R with a DMM (digital multimeter)? The ODC5R is sitting on a RCK16 and is being controlled by a PAC R2. From the literature that I have observed, there is no schematic diagram that characterizes this module. If there is literature available can anyone point me to this literature.

I am trying to see if the unit is damaged or not. If no literature is available, can you tell me how to set the ODC5R (R=relay) in IO Manager (specify/set the ODC5R as what type of point)?

Can you give me an approximate electical value that I should see when I close the “unit” and when I open the “unit”?

This post was edited because I believe that although the “marketing” term refers to “relay”, the actual module (“unit”) may not contain a “relay coil”. Opto22 literature refers to “solid state” relays which are fundamentally different from a common relay that utilizes a coil. Testing that a solid state relay meets its advertised specifications may be different than testing a conventional relay that utilizes a coil. Anyway, can anyone answer my question?

Thank you for your time.


#2

To anyone interested in this thread, using an ohm meter, the only noticeable electrical change is the change in resistance when the relay is opened or closed.

If anyone has any advice on what are the optimal loads using a semiconductor relay, I would be interested in this topic. Unfortunately, without a schematic diagram I can’t be certain of what would be the best way to utilize this unit in the field.

Also, if anyone knows of any “pitfalls” to watch out for when using this module this would be welcome advice.


#3

ODC5R is not a solid state relay, it is a reed relay. If you go to the product page, you can read more about its specifications, or can download associated documentation. The documentation includes some information in schematics, and also recommendations on loads.

http://www.opto22.com/site/pr_details.aspx?cid=4&item=SNAP-ODC5R

You could learn more about different types of relays from Wikipedia, or you may want to consult with someone who has had electrical training.


#4

Dear Sensij:

In my first post I initially wrote that I could not find meaningful literature about the relay. This is what I wrote:

“Can you please point me to literature that will tell me how to correctly test the SNAP ODC5R with a DMM (digital multimeter)? The ODC5R is sitting on a RCK16 and is being controlled by a PAC R2. From the literature that I have observed, there is no schematic diagram that characterizes this module. If there is literature available can anyone point me to this literature.”

Opto22 literature I had read referred to solid state relays. I believe opto22 started out as a solid state relay manufacturer. Therefore, given the fact that I had no documentation about the specific product, I mentioned that it was possible that the module was a solid state relay, so as to inform the reader of the different varieties of relays available, as a reminder. This would decrease the possibility of incorrect information being returned.

I would like to thank you for finding me literature with regard to this product. However, you had made the assumption that I had read specific literature about the product, and had detailed knowledge of what type of relay I had in my possession. This was not a correct observation. I had mentioned that I required the need for a schematic diagram, therefore, I could not be certain of what type of relay, or support circuitry, was contained in the module[I]. [/I]

[I]I wrote this post because I couldn’t find any specific literature about this product. I would like to thank you for locating some literature for me. [/I]


#5

Dear Sensij:

I would like to thank you for your reply.

I originally wrote this post because I could not find any relevant information about this module. I did read some literature that stated that OPTO22 originally started out as a solid state relay manufacturer. Therefore, I indicated in my original that it may be possible that the unit I had in my possession was a solid state relay, this was done to be certain that the person who had answered my question considered all the possible relays that OPTO22 is offering.

At work I received an assorted bag of relays and I had to identify each one. The bag that contained these relays had some markings on it, indicating that some point were not working. However, I could not find literature about this particular relay, hence this post. I never actually stated that the module was a solid state relay. I wasn’t certain what type of relay I had in my possession because I had no schematic diagram for this module.

I am going to look at the literature and see if I can find a schematic diagram and I am going to get back to you if I can’t find a detailed schematic diagram.

By the way, since OPTO22 started out as a semiconductor relay company, perhaps it may be a good idea to publish a document about the “pitfalls” of working with semiconductor relays for your customers. Interested readers of this post may want to take notice that I had read that SSRs may become damaged by high initial currents flows depending on the type of load one connects to the output of SSRs. One needs to be careful when connecting these units to specific types of loads.

Thank you for your post.


#6

Hi EIO,

Each of our modules have manuals. If you take a look at the web site, you will find docs for each module.
Here is the screen shot of page 5 of the SNAP-ODC5R module.
Note the schematic diagram that gives an overview of the module as you mention in your first post in this thread.


The manuals on the web site are always the latest version.
Searching for the part number will almost always bring you to the right page. From there you can find the Documents tab and download what you need.

Regarding ‘pitfalls’ of SSR’s, please take a moment to review the last few pages of Document 0859, the Solid State Data Sheet;
http://documents.opto22.com/0859_Solid_State_Relays_data_sheet.pdf
(This doc is the top result when you do a search on the Opto website for ‘solid state relays’).
It has an FAQ at the end and in the preceding pages, it goes over the different applications that SSR’s sometimes get used in and things to take note of, for example, heater loads, transformer loads, three phase, single phase and so on.

Ben.