Restore trends after restarting PAC Display Runtime


#1

Every time the PAC display runtime is closed, then re-opened, I lose the trends that were already traced. Is there a way to restore this after a restart?


#2

Diobado1,
You need to use SuperTrends to log to the hard drive. Look in Pac Display user guide for super trends.
If you’re using supertrends, make sure you have configured for combined real and historical. Then, if all that’s good, then you simply need to click the little button at bottom of chart that looks like a file folder and it will open a list of files that have been logged and you open them one at a time and you can then get the historical.
Pac Display saves the data as per your config to files abd once you close Display, you have to open the logged files that have been closed. Check out the Setup tab of the SuperTrend setup.


#3

Barret,

We are using supertrends and logs are being saved to the hard drive. The feature we would like to have is to be able to see the historical (at least to fill the trend time span) without having to open the logged file.


#4

Yes I agree, that is a really really old whine for me.


#5

Like the old paragon trends… Those were pretty great. Configurable on the fly (add/remove pens, change scaling, etc.), actual combined historical and realtime data…


#6

Oh so you were also an old Paragon guy too? Yes those were good 'ol days…that was my first system ever, 5 display workstations connected via netbui and eventually 2 - 486 PC’s running the processes on over 300 classic IO and 1 - LC4 out on the floor running a web process. That was fun…


#7

Not directly. I’m technically the ‘plant engineer’ at a cold storage. When I started (6 yrs. ago) it was running paragon controlling ~30 B1/B2 boards full of I/O plus a few Modbus RTU devices. I learned how to manipulate the program, but never got into the actual programming myself. A few years later I started setting up a Snap PAC system to take over the packing shed controls from an assortment of GE & Direct Logic controllers. The old programmer was slow to respond, hard to get onsite in a timely fashion, and expensive.

Last year we converted the cold storage over to Snap PAC simply for compatibility/replaceability. The Paragon control PC was on it’s last leg and my understanding was we were lucky to be running Win7. Well, if that PC died we would be SOL. Not a good situation with potentially $millions in product sitting in storage.

I still miss the Paragon trending. They were very powerful/configurable.


#8

I was doing the Paragon thing back in '93 when it was unheard of to have a fully Ethernet networked control system, albeit 10 meg was still way better than 115k serial. Its amazing only 6 years ago you still had a working Paragon system. I still have some keys floating around here…
I had to tear down a 1000 block program and rebuild it completely and I had never even worked on a PLC or any control system before that.
It was way before it’s time because in addition to the overall sophistication including an SPC function block, you could build a process graphically and download it directly to an Opto22 LC4 controller, it was very cool. The LC4 had a ROM chip that you could get from Opto22 that had the Paragon programming in it. There was a version of Paragon that came along in their late stages that split up the CPU on a PC and created a separate OS environment that had direct connection to the hardware and was very very fast.
Ok, so you are doing the cold storage thing, eh? I have been doing the Cargill Turkey plant refrigeration system in Waco, TX for about 12 years. It was interesting enough, but working for Cargill has it’s issues…they are pretty much an AB shop now, mostly because of one mechanical outfit that installed a whole bunch of Opto over the years there and essentially screwed it all up. Of course Cargill did not help, because they are way too cheap to hire appropriately skilled techs either.